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Submitted on
December 29, 2013
Image Size
641 KB
Resolution
900×589
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Views
4,527 (2 today)
Favourites
345 (who?)
Comments
21
Downloads
145

Camera Data

Make
NIKON CORPORATION
Model
NIKON D5100
Shutter Speed
13/1 second
Aperture
F/11.0
Focal Length
12 mm
ISO Speed
100
Date Taken
Mar 21, 2012, 1:35:49 AM
Software
Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4.4 (Macintosh)
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Jail House Blues by stengchen Jail House Blues by stengchen
!!!!!
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:iconblumilein:
blumilein Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2014   Photographer
:wow: Supercool!
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:iconstengchen:
stengchen Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2014
thanks:)
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:iconstengchen:
stengchen Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2013
thanks very much @ all for the comments, wish you happy new year;)
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:iconimpromptus:
impromptus Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Amazing. The framing is impeccable and the sharpness you were able to achieve even with the HDR is absolutely amazing. The lighting makes a fabulous contrast with the eerie location itself. Congratulations!
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:iconmikestevenson1955:
mikestevenson1955 Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2013
Nice!
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:iconarslanejaz33:
Arslanejaz33 Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2013
very artistic......
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:iconc1rcu1tn3rd:
c1rcu1tn3rd Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
I've always felt like HDR indoor shots look like video game graphics
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:iconsonicvortex99:
Sonicvortex99 Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2013  Student Photographer
What is HDR exactly?
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:iconc1rcu1tn3rd:
c1rcu1tn3rd Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
It stands for high dynamic range. It means taking multiple pictures at different brightness levels and then compiling them together. That way you get detail in shadows and in highlights. It's often used to make things look unusual by tweaking the settings. One example of how it could be used and still retain a realistic photo is having someone stand indoors next to a window and taking a picture. The camera will automatically either make the person lit correctly and blow out the background or make the background right but the person will be super dark. What you would do is set the camera to manual so you can control the brightness. You then take one where the person is a silhouette and another with the outside correct (it's strongly recommended you use a tripod or else your pictures will most likely not line up perfectly). You then compile them in a program such as photoshop, nik, lightroom, etc. Depending on the difference of brightness levels it's called a stop difference. +1 stop means an image is twice as bright. Lets say you compiled the image and one picture was -2 stops and the other +2 stops. You'd have a stop range then of 4 for the compiled image. Generally most people who use HDR use between 5-7 pictures and put those together. There are other ways to achieve HDR as well but what I described is the most common way. I hope all that makes sense. It's easier to say than to type sometimes.
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